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First of all…

DON’T FEEL LIKE YOU NEED TO READ ALL THIS TO START WITH!

I’ve summarised some of the basic concepts on this Wiki, but I’m sure it’s a bit of an information overload at first. The key things you should do is skim this page and check out the Races and Classes pages for some brief intros to what you can play.

From there, I can help you make a character, or even make one for you.

Introduction

We’re playing the 5th edition of Dungeons & Dragons! The basic rules can be found here for free download. This gives you a sample of races, classes, and the general rules of play. The full book has much more in it, but it’s also three times the size.

Hit the Game Master (GM) up if you’re interested in reading the full rules (PDF format).

Don’t feel like you have to read and digest the whole thing (or even read it at all). This page should summarise the key points to get you started.

Character Creation

In D&D, as many games of its kind, you make up a fantasy character and act it out – i.e., you ‘roleplay’. It’s kind of like collective story-telling, where the Game Master (GM) and the dice help decide the outcome of your desired actions.

You can make a character based off a movie or book character, something entirely from your imagination, or even a super badass version of yourself.

All characters/players have a character sheet, which is used to keep track of your character’s stats, like their strength or their hit points. If you’ve played any video game RPG ever, the basic concepts should be familiar to you, but maybe not tracking it yourself…

How to Play

It’s actually really easy! The GM will describe the scene you find yourselves in, and you tell the GM what you would like to do. The GM then determines the outcome of that action, often with the help of dice.

There are a not insignificant amount of rules in D&D, but to begin with, all you really need to do is just tell the GM what you would like to try and do. Let them handle the hard parts of knowing just how to do it.

Usually, you’ll roll 1d20 and add the appropriate modifiers according to the situation. For example, to move a boulder, you might add your Strength bonus to the d20 roll.

Here’s a chart of the dice we use…

DD-Dice4.jpg

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